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Shang

Shang

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Product no.: BINE CD02

CD

13.90 € *
*
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Shang

Westzeit (DE)
With catalogue number 002, yet another album from the (remote) environment of AG Geige/Raster gets its release, following the outstanding Byetone cd. The first solo album by Tilo Seidel aka Tol had been released on Raster-Noton, with him being part of the Produkt live sessions. Back with his new solo works, Tol rediscovers the sound scapes of the late incoming! Label whose warm yet abstract digital neo dub had been big in the 90's. Reduced to only a few, nevertheless precisely edited and arranged samples, a headbanger's hookline in sub bass realms and some really hillarious melodic fragments - that is summer's sound from a harddisc.

 

Spex (DE)
Bine 002 was created by Tilo Seidel, intending to recreate early 90's dub electro from Heidelberg on Tol.Shang. Sometimes the sound is somewhat static and cold, with dub being warm and organic at its best, and therefore falls behind its consequently cool predecessor Byetone.Feld. Still it is a convincing offer from an underrated musical corner. Music as well as neutral aesthetic installations.

 

DE:BUG (DE)
Tilo Seidel's second release after his debut on Raster-Noton with Frank Bretschneider, this time all on his own on BineMusic. You will hear electronic sceletons of slow tracks that get some melodic meat on their bones, full of dubby reverbs and delay, making them smoothly jumping and rolling downtempo style. There is plenty of air within the tracks, so you won't have to fear running into something nor getting yourself black and blue. All is padded just too good with soft sounds, not to forget that all is happening in super dub slow motion anyway. No risks, smooth landing garantueed in the land of dubtronica. Fluffy as hell.

 

Intro (DE)
Talking about Tilo Seidel, one dives deep into dub, bass, electronic beats and sequenced reggae patterns that make "Tol.Shang" a home listening album on which the sounds slowly unfold. Even while panning through the room from left to right, they still remain clear and separated, creating enough distance between his work and the music of rhythm & sound or artists like tomas jirku. Yet sometimes one wishes for some more own trademarks, since many of the techsounds are quite familiar - or some grasping groove guiding the listener through all the heights and depths. On the other hand the bass digs itself deep into the ground, rolling on and on. A solid debut album making me curious about the following releases.

 

A-ha Magazine (DE)
Electronic sound baubles and experiment in its true sense, a contrast to the contemptonary music mainstream for sure... The first solo album by Tilo Seidel aka Tol. "The love for dub, electro and ambient flows in just as with (the last album) Tol.Trap" (T. Seidel). By mixing impressions and sounds of asia trips, the puristic self-made electro sound gets upgraded with sperical sound patterns. For me this record is much more trancey than most of the mediation music following ancient cosmic principles, coming from those esoteric institues.

 

Chemnitzer Stadtmagazin "371" (DE)
Tilo Seidel took his time - it's been six years since his last release under the Tol.Trap moniker, with him spending most of his time as a dj, most times as part of Chemnitz dancehall sound system Phatline Sound. Now the new Tol.Shang gets released, and leaving his otherwise driving dj sets behind himself, Tol creates a nice atmosphere that manages not to be restricted to a cleary defined genre. While the opener "Shine" is a classic dub number, the sound evolves during the whole album. Minimalistic click electronic meets computer reggae, soft but still integrated accurately by its bass lines. Tol varies this game from track to track in a very subtile way that just invites to press the repeat button over and over again. Tol.Shang gets released on the young essen label BineMusic that follows the path of Mille Plateaux and Raster-Noton. Tol.Shang is without doubt a great step in this direction.

 

Smallfish (UK)
A lovely cd from this label i've not heard of before. Has a = downbeat, electronic, glitch, Raster style feel at times, but is more heavily melodic and dubby than their stuff. Each track has a nice flava and clearly this guy has a lot of talent. Chilled out and fresh.

 

Igloo Magazine (US)
Wiggly electro-dub with a touch of mid 90's s.e.t.i. for good measure, Shang is the shape of the first solo release from Tol (Tilo Seidel) who has formerly worked under the same moniker with Frank Bretschneider. This time out he's breaking loose from the isolation of colder, dissonance to create a fleshy recording that is the perfect summer record. The percussion is right, the beats are grooving, the fingersnaps on "prepair" are blissfully woven from fore to background. Voice samples are used in patterns, not really as vocals, and add a human touch. The sounds on "leave" are like the foundry for something ala Jamaica 2020, the sunny tinpan drum beat is vivid and rootsy as it mixes with Seidel's electronica (Cubase and Reason) blend. Laptops usually don't project such heat, but his Mac is on fire. This sort of takes some of the real basic principles used by Stefan Betke, but gives it real world flavor and isn't afraid to cross over into real high and dry dub rhythms, as occurring in the melting "Snow" and the percussion on "Ride." eh, mon, "Swing" proves this is a laid back party record too with the smiley synthesizer just vaguely hinting at early 80s techno. Animation hip-hop themes are illustrated on the fidgety and soulful "Draw." BineMusic offers artists a forum to create sounds that flow through their heads into ours that do not necessarily follow the dots of their former artist selves. This allows for the opportunity to experience sound that elaborates from past projects as obviously heard here on Shang. As tol closes this session with "Yard" he channels goose bumps by delving into a bit of his past with this finely shades-of-gray mix. A very stylish icy piece that induces chills, don't be afraid - play it loud. TJ Norris, contributing editor.