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Sounds From The Moon

Sounds From The Moon

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Product no.: BINE CD28

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Sounds From The Moon

De:Bug (DE)
Yes, that's the grand dub gesture again, even if it's sprinkled with some dancefloor flavour. But Laurent Bisch knows the ropes so perfectly that it's not bad at all and only tells half the story. Bisch aims for more, digs himself deep in pop just as much as in Detroit/Berlin nonchalance, whirls Echospace while knocking Burger/Ink down a peg after 15 years - and just grabs us tightly. With hall and beats. Great and eternal.

 

Boomkat (UK)
Richly atmospheric Dub Techno delicacy surfacing from a new French producer. Well, we say new, but Laurent Bisch has been making music for over twenty years now; it's just taken this long to for him to release something. A few albums and EPs have met with warm praise on a few netlabels in recent years, with 'Sounds From The Moon' marking his entry to the physical realm thanks to Bine Music. It's a lovely set, full of featherlite melodic nonchalance balanced with sub-tropical dub bass and guided by a well apparent knowledge of ambient dancefloor requirements.

 

Vital Weekly (NL)
Behind Fingers In The Noise - which I think is a pretty silly name - is one Laurent Bisch, 1966, from France, and father of three kids and he started to produce techno music twenty years ago 'after taking a few piano lessons' (I wonder what the relation is there). He likes ambient, dub, deep and experimental and such like and its no more long party nights for him, but a more peaceful life, in which he uses his free time to record his own music and after releasing some EPs (which term these days can be any kind of format, physical or otherwise) this is his debut album. Eleven pieces of exactly what he likes: ambient, deep, dub and hardly experimental - although what is considered experimental in this particular angle of the world I don't know. Maybe its because I don't know that much about this kind of music, so its hard for me to judge this in terms of musical development, i.e. the bigger picture of all those things deep, dub, techno, ambient, but judging from what I hear in this direction (and to be honest, that usually comes from the likes of labels such as Bine Music, so perhaps not the best reference) this is not too different from what I usually hear. Is that a bad thing? No, I don't think so. Music like this is not about being 'innovative' at all. Its all, I should assume at least, about being entertaining on whatever personal level is convenient for the consumer/listener. I can imagine that people like this while driving a car, vacuum cleaning, a private party, or simply reading the newspaper (which is what I did). All of this is valid, obviously, and therefore it makes it very hard for me to say anything negative about this. Nothing new, quite old, retro if you want, and all such like, but the entertaining factor was quite high. That's all that sometimes matters. (FdW)

 

Westzeit (DE)
Presumably Bine's contact with Laurent Bisch - French family father, bedroom musician and man behind this rather odd ring name - came about through Lars Leonhard. At least they are both friends according to FITN's website, and Leonhard is behind the recent ambient house-y Bine releases after all. Spiritual brothers they are for sure, since the lunar sounds too are characterized by soft halls, light waving and punctuated bass beats, further refined by carefully chosen samples (I love the "hammer against rock" sound on the title track!) All of this is anything but new of course, yet still highly pleasant to consume. Especially with a cold drink during mild summer nights.

 

Croove (DE)
Though he could pass as a new name amongst hall and echo explorers, Laurent Bisch a.k.a. Fingers In The Noise has been making music for over 20 years but simply took his time for his first releases. During the last three years, the French artist released three albums and several EP's of atmospheric dub techno on various net labels, now adding an album on the Essen label BineMusic to his catalogue. Compared to classic dub techno in the vein of Basic Channel, Fingers In The Noise chose softer and more melodic form of expression - the album lightly floats away without ever breaking its progression. In the end, this album leaves its listener behind without any true highlights but the indefinite feeling of having experiences something beautiful.