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Benjamin Brunn

Benjamin Brunn

Benjamin Brunn


77

77

Vital Weekly (NL)
It seems that Bine Music only releases music by Scanner, Move D and Benjamin Brunn. I am no DJ, but I love to go to places where people dance to music. I even admit that one point I like minimal techno very much, but these days, at home, this music hardly gets a welcome applause from me. The house/techno inspired pieces on this 12" sound a bit worn out, but perhaps its me who is worn out, even when half through some strange brass band element is thrown in. Who knows. No doubt the DJ knows how to handle this, and like to play this in their environment, but for me personally, being the 'objective reviewer in armchair', it didn't do much. (FdW)

 

Kompakt (DE)
House to like, somewhere between ambient, jazz and club, by someone who knows his business...

 

Hard Wax (DE)
Atmospheric tripping & percussive cut-up tech house.

 


 

Paul and Raymond

Paul and Raymond

Vital Weekly (NL)
'This record is dedicated to Paul and Raymond whose zest for life was with me six months long. I will keep it' it says somewhat mysteriously on the press text. Benjamin Brunn is, along with Scanner and Move D, a stalwart artist of Bine Music, but reviewing this two track 12" is not an easy task. The rhythm driven music will surely work well on the dance floor, but who am I to tell? I am not a DJ, not even a regular visitor of the dance floor, let alone known for moving my feet, so what can I do with in the cosy place called home with it? I can play it, like it even, but I realize that's hard for me to say wether this is great minimal techno, or perhaps a faint copy of the real thing. The watershed between me and the world of minimal techno is simply too big. So, I didn't dance around, but sat down, thought the fat bass was great, the light, dubby keyboards were nice and I thought it was damn nice record. And oh, I thought, I should go out more and dance more. (FdW)

 

Boomkat (UK)
It's always a pleasure to discover there's a new Benjamin Brunn 12" in circulation, and this latest proves to be an especially magnificent piece of work. Both tracks are outstanding in production terms, with the A-side kicking off under the pretence of being just some above-average slab of glitch techno before opening up into something far more full-bodied, remaining engaging and inventive to the very last. The B-side is enormously beautiful (you know, in techno terms at least), featuring exceptional low-end definition and crystalline high frequencies thanks to a dazzling network of echo chamber synth blips. This stuff goes way beyond the call of duty. Highly recommended.

 

Kompakt (DE)
Both sides filled with beautiful and great sounding, moderate techno, worlds apart from paint-by-numbers productions, bine once more proves to be a pearl among a thousand grains of sand.

 

Westzeit (DE)
Nowadays the Chemnitz born lives in Hamburg, but moving from the introspectively saxon outskirts (wich, thanks to Raster-Noton, aren't that out after all) to the cosmopolitan city had virtually no influence on the already Brunn-typical sound. For eight minutes each, the aptly titled "Paul" and "Raymond" give off the minimal-house charm of grooves Brunn most possibly elicited from his Nord Modular system. Organic-abstract music to dance to. And there's another thing: there is an mp3 teaser for free download from Binemusic.com for an upcoming SD card release of sonic data by Fold. Despite it's shortness, the piano crunching "Savour The Butterflies" is worth it!

 

DE:BUG (DE)
Always a pleasure to hear some new tracks by Benjamin Brunn - double so if they are as funky and tight as these! "Paul" (the A side) takes a beautifully simple chord and carpenters a simpatico groove around it - a rain gutter for all the sonic trash out there, so to speak. As soon as the garbage has been taken out, the hi-hat takes the centre stage and I swear I have seen leaps of joy at this point. A dry filter bonanza par excellence. "Raymond" on the other hand is much more sound-affected and covers the dancefloor like a droplet infection of pure vitamin C, with its fine staccatos rolling off us like spring rain. We laugh and loll homewards.

 


 

Let's Call It A Day

Let's Call It A Day

Smallfish (UK)
*One of my favourite albums of the year so far - back in stock* Bine have always delivered high quality electronic music on the deeper, slightly more minimalist tip. This natural sound of theirs lends itself to the collaborative work of one of Smallfish's fave producers, David Moufang, along with Benjamin Brunn. Big fans of both artists, actually, and together they've concocted a subtle, mellow and very, very beautiful showcase of how to create truly sublime electronic atmospheres. Each track is filled to brimming with soul and gorgeous sound design and, to be perfectly honest, there's a not a moment on this delicious CD that could be called anything other than wonderful. High praise? Certainly. And there's a good reason for that... it's just plain superb. Highly recommended.

 

Boomkat (UK)
Move D (aka David Moufang) and Benjamin Brunn come across like some kind of minimal tag-team on 'Let's Call It A Day' - bringing their individual styles to bear on a collaboration that is neither clinical nor fussy. Meeting at Resource Studio in Heidelberg to record 'Let's Call It A Day', the pairing of Moufang and Brunn exist very much in the spaces between the machine's heartbeats - taking an evident cue from the tracing paper schematic of Raster Noton then feeding it through their own vision of stripped beauty. Ensuring that proceedings don't get mired down amongst insular clicks and edits, 'Let's Call It A Day' very much has it's eye on the overtly animated end of the genre - wherein the crystalline beats and pinprick compositions are bathed in rich chord structures that blur the potentially stark environs to pleasing effect. Allowing the dubby techno heritage to bubble throughout, opening track 'C-Sick' bounces around the speakers with necromantic intent - drawing in wisps of electronics and creased beats to form a whole that is energetic without breaking a sweat. Next up is 'On The Magic Bus', wherein any memories of vomit stained journeys through town on a decrepit double-decker are bleached clean by a crawling web of fidgety resonance and looped beats that install themselves deep within the cranium and refuse to leave. Very much ensuring a human touch is left throughout, Moufang and Brunn's fingerprints are clear to see - as the likes of 'Grains', 'A' and '?' temper the silicon with majestic and sprawling sun-set soundscapes. Detailed, grand and human to the core, 'Let's Call It A Day' proves just how intoxicating binary can be.

 

Vital Weekly (NL)
One of the core artists of Bine Music is Benjamin Brunn, of whom they released two 12"s before, and now a full length, collaborative CD with Move D, also known as David Moufang. He plays his 'flying carpet' and Brunn his Nord Modular synth. I am not sure how literal we should take the title, but it was produced over a period of three days, before they called it a day. Lengthy, minimal and spacious. Those are the words to describe this. A rhythm is set forward, feeding through synths and minimally changes in both texture and rhythm is set forward. Tracks can be up to seventeen minutes and with seven in total, I must admit some boredom leaped in. The material is only on a superficial level different, but the ground idea remains the same for each track, and the spacious keyboard lines start to irritate and one starts wondering who this music is made for. It's not for people who dance, but at the same time, it's to rhythmic to just sit back and relax. Given that the musical innovation is far away, this is an ambient dance record that would have fitted well on Fax Records ten years ago, but now since a bit overdue. (FdW)

 

Kompakt (DE)
Produced at resource studio in heidelberg, move d's base, seven techno-ambient tracks invite to relax and more for more than 70 minutes.

 


 

De-Escalate

De-Escalate

Smallfish (UK)
This is another serious piece of work from Benjamin Brunn who continues to impress with some staggeringly deep and lush music. As a follow up to 'Music Under Pin' it's about as perfect as you could imagine and features three divine slices of very playable minimal, dubbed out and warm Techno plus a gorgeous, more downbeat cut. The main track is a prime example of how to do reduced grooves without resorting to glitched-up noises whilst retaining a depth and beauty that shines. A seriously excellent EP that's highly recommended for fans of great electronic music.

 

Boomkat (UK)
We're avid followers of the far too occasional Bine label - and Brunn has produced two of the best releases for Bine. "Slow down the escalator" is simply enveloping, resounding beefy bass vibration, steppers tempo, but all the attention to original sound design you could wish for. The heritage of this music is well documented - but Brun has still managaed to provide a fresh twist on the dubby aspect of minimal techno. Thank you voxxx weaves gorgeous textures, small eddies of sound become disjointed and are then in turn reassembled, with a thorughly engaging treble ranged drone providing focal interest. "I prefer elevators" makes plain a connection to the intricacies of the .snd sound - no clicks nor cuts, just a static loop and a juddered sound chamber resonance which proves wholly mesmerising, until a bumping bass flex really catches light.

 

Groove (DE)
One of the best sequels of minimal dubtech comes from saxon Benjamin Brunn, who - after releases on Ware and USM - already had been in the spotlight on BineMusic for both "König und Drache" and "Music Under Pin". Decorated with soft-melancholic bells, the minmal trance of "slow down the escalator!" gets slightly out of sync with the time, yet still works pretty tidy with its head-nodding bass, while "i prefer elevators" draws a impressing synergy of minimal dub and broken electro acid.

 

Kompakt (DE)
Bass-strong minimal experimental, floatingly abstracted tracks in an ambient cosmos... Pinches your eardrum and feels good!

 

Westzeit (DE)
With his new 12" (again limited to 500 copies; for all non-turntable owners Bine offers a nice service: they will receive a cdr along with their vinyl) Brunn's oevre adds up to a trilogy. Following the album "König und Drache" and "Music Under Pin", featuring some prominent remixes and four new tracks, he now presents 4 tracks which softly, but consequently aim to mix warm bass loops with intelligent sound design. Mimimalism with great depth, even club-appealing in the right environment. Those familiar with Chemnitz will sure recognize the nod to local scene club "Voxxx", while for the cover, friends of photography gonna admire Brunn's talent on yet another sector as well.

 

Forced Exposure (US)
The most clubby bine release so far. 'Tricky disco' somewhere between modern love & monolake.

 

Vital Weekly (NL)
This is the follow up to 'Music Under Pin' (see vital weekly 481), which then presented four tracks by the for me unknown Benjamin Brunn and four remixes, including one by Frank Bretschneider. Here he is by himself again, with another four tracks of minimal techno. A forceful yet minimal rhythm built each of the tracks and small icing is put on the cake. It's not in it's kind but also nothing ground breaking new. If i was a dj of this kind stuff (or in fact a dj at all), i would perhaps stick this in my record bag and give it a few spins along some of the finer Bretschneider and Kompakt stuff - it wouldn't be a too strange thing to do and would no doubt be a good spin. But at home, these pieces by itself didn't do much for me. (fdw)

 

Phonica Records (UK)
Four tracks from the more abstract end of the german minimal techno spectrum from an artist who has previously recorded sapcious electronica sounds. Will appeal to fans of studio pankow etc.

 

DE:BUG (DE)
Four very ringing, finely chiselled tracks by Benjamin Brunn which more than ever present him conquering the dancefloor without forbearing from anything that defines his sound. Adding soundscapes like "thank you voxxx" and experiments like "my town is electric", but it's the two more straight tracks that hit a nerve and drill into you.

 


 

Music Under Pin

Music Under Pin

Vital Weekly (NL)
A good idea: present four track by the unknown Benjamin Brunn on one side and offer four remixes by some well-known chums on the other and there might be some stir. Brunn composes all his music using one Nord modular patch (a machine also frequently used by Frank Bretschneider), except 'Echlaid-backoes Of BCN', which uses solely sounds from the streets of Barcelona. In the three Nord tracks, Brunn proofs to be a good listener to the work of Bretschneider, SND and a whole bunch of other micro-beat composers. Music with a downbeat groove, dubby and overall minimalist. With the barest minimum of sound information, Brunn tries to achieve the maximum, and he succeeds quite well. Of course the material is not overtly new or innovative, but it passes the test. The short Barcelona is a different affair, and it would be good to have this longer - maybe a new direction. On the b-side a remix by Move D (well-known from his releases on Fax, Source and Warp), who doesn't add much else to the mix, save maybe for some extra synth-lines. Scanner's remix is more full of sound and presents a rather 'busy' mix. Thomas Touzimsky stays also close to the original music but seems a bit lighter in approach. Only the mix by Alexander Wendt takes the material into more ambient areas. Despite these various reservations, this turned out to be a nice record, nothing demanding on a hot day like this. (FdW)

 

Boomkat (UK)
Brunn's fabulous 'Konig und Drache' cd on Bine last year was a stealthy hit and much loved by all who crossed paths with it. Here he provides four glittering new tunes and enlists support from Move D, Scanner, Thomas Touzimsky, and Wendt remixing four highlights from the previous album. So that's the factual bit over with, leaving us more than enough space to tell you exactly how good this is. 'Raval Cat' travels a parallel, less alien route to Komet's minimalism - 'Dot obsession' widens the lens to almost eyeball shredding panoramas, huge majestic sweeps which adherents ot the Monolake sound will adore. 'Developers developers' skitters along with lovely mid-range swells - a motive and emotive stasis which develops in tiny increments and yet shifts you into a bass space of joy. So much to reward repeat listening here - don't miss out.

 

Forced Exposure (US)
"Pure and deep and similar to the Black Dog releases. It's hard to describe the mixture on this release, ranging from sharp edges and spiky needles over playing kids and cornflakes to candyfloss, stormclouds and holey skyscraper storefronts. For us, Music Under Pin is the result of euphony research within an area between white noise and pop. The raw materials were captured in Barcelona by Brunn with his Minidisc recorder only. the other three tracks were crafted in the usual manner, from a single nord modular patch; the nord modular is his only instrument. limiting his range of sounds lets Benjamin focus his attention on the smallest bits, leading to the best result: 'get the most out of it'."

 

DE:BUG (DE)
Oh well, Benjamin Brunn just does too few releases. But when he does, like he did on the enchanting BineMusic label, he delivers a whole album of minimally whispered, polka-dotted tracks which brings back the world of elegant grooves and subtle effects in such a bandwidth that makes you wish old-school never happened. Perfect tracks filled with foggy light you are merged in like in a parallel dimension in which sounds are not made to rock the floor but smoothly turn your whole life into a dance of things.

 

Westzeit (DE)
The first Bine vinyl (in a collectible run of 500 copies) presents, on the a-side, four new tracks by Chemnitz sound wizard Brunn: the nord modular patches already known from his debut album "König und Drache" (released last year on BineMusic, too) blandish with simple beauty, and the limitation to this both abstract and concrete form of music extraction offers more possibilities than one might except, which got also noted by the prominent list of remixers (Scanner, Move D, Touzimsky and Wendt) whose interpretations slip the already known tracks into new clothes on the b-side. This, of course, sounds much better than the last sentence does.

 

Spex (DE)
The first BineMusic vinyl release by the fabulous Benjamin Brunn. "Music Under Pin" (Kompakt/A-Musik) comes includes four new tracks with agglomerations of pads, tops and bass fundaments, as well as four remixes by Move D, Scanner, Thomas Touzimsky and Wendt which together form a truly coherent unit.

 

Kompakt (DE)
Small, round and gently minimalistic album from the Bine forge to love and listen to. Includes remixes by Move D., Scanner, Th. Touzimsky and Wendt.

 

Smallfish (UK)
Lush, wonderful, splendidly gorgeous sounds from mr. Brunn that features four awesome new tracks (in a similar vein to the tracks on last years fantastic 'König und Drache' cd) and four absolutely sublime remixes from Move D, Scanner, Thomas Touzimsky and Wendt. The originals are brilliant examples of how to do atmospheric, minimal electronics but with acres of warmth and soul whilst the remix showcase a subtly different but equally beautiful series of interpretations of the already amazing source material. This is sublime and you'd be mad to miss out. Recommended without hesitation.

 

Phonica Records (UK)
A versatile long player from this excellent Chemnitz imprint and producer Benjamin Brunn; moving through minimal techno, intricate arrhythmic electronica and deep ambient textures, this album displays the quintessentially teutonic charcteristic of being utterly minimal yet funky. A compelling recording!

 


 

König und Drache

König und Drache

Boomkat (UK)
This is one of those releases you stumble across more or less by accident and end up getting completely overtaken by its simple complexity and goosebump-inducing beauty. Released on the Raster-Noton sponsored "Bine" imprint, "König Und Drache (king and dragon) explores a sort of effortlessly organic blend of microscopically crunchy House music and night-time glowing loveliness, most often bringing to mind Jan Jelinek's work as Farben but considerably less focused on those signature jazz-loops and samples. The depth of field here is widened by virtue of Brunn's innate melodic responses and wide open instincts for bridging squashed 4/4 beats and effervescent melodic underlays with an incredible ability to involve. His childhood dabbling with classical Piano playing comes across through these often resolutely percussive tracks, as does his cross-cultural background (roots in both Dresden and Taiwan) - something which lends this incredible album an air of both determination and introspection. A quiet masterpiece of an album that comes with a huge recommendation - immediate listening required.

 

DE:BUG (DE)
Extremely beautiful minimal record full of mysterious chords, silent beats and very dense atmosphere without being limited to be just minimal house but somehow ever evolves. Whoever knows his tracks on Mole, USM, Out To Lunch or ware won't be too surprised, yet happy to see benhamin took his time to perfect the more subtle side of his sound.

 

Westzeit (DE)
Brunn also comes from Chemnitz (to where BineMusic and Raster-Noton also got strong links) but has been more socialized through house and techno then through experimental and minimal music (his 12"s usually appearing on Ware and Mole). Yet for his first real album he reduced his sound. "König und Drache" fascinates with melodic, house related, still almost scanty tracks. Wether or not this is due to his experiences during a longer Taiwan visit were really as imprinting as we are told by the title and the liner notes we can not say, but with such a convincing result, we do not care at all.

 

Groove (DE)
Until now appearing mainly on USM and Ware ("Laminar EP"), Benjamin Brunn's debut album on BineMusic reflects the last years he spent between Chemnitz, Dresden and Taiwan. "König und Drache" takes up the both strict and nocturne tech-house of his ware releases but spins his sounds further away from the dancefloor, up to an academic understanding of spartanic yet deep minimalism, somehow linking him with similar approaches from richie hatwin and his concept series. It's the temporizingly rhythmical title track "König und Drache" which merges this cold sensuality with the improvisations of Asian music box dub, casting his spell over the listeners, while "Cool ist hier" with its trembly organ pad effects and the drop click techno opus "Liebling" are a lot more thumping.

 

Wire (UK)
Although Benjamin Brunn's music has been cropping up courtesy of labels like Ware, Out To Lunch and USM on compilation cds and eps for the last four or five years, this is his debut album. Brunn draws inspiration from both his native Germany and his current country of residence, Taiwan-hence the title /which translates as "King and Dragon"). His fractured, attenuated take on house music proves to be a subtle and flexible medium for the expression of abstruse emotion. His 4/4 constructions dare to abandon the central pulse of the kickdrum, and the rest of the mix revolves with cerebral care around the spaces where the beats would usually be. The opening track "Welcome Engineer" climbs and falls through a haze of muffled clubland chords, but the radioactive digital crackles creeping gradually across the foreground convey a sense of abandonment. (rather than abandon) with mournful economy. "Cool ist hier" teeters with surgical clarity around a giddy off-beat, like a post-glitch sweet exorcist, gradually clothing itself in the stately systole and diastole of a pristine, two chord motif, while the aching, slow glitter of "Port Of Keelung" brings things to a close with quiet precision.

 

Kompakt (DE)
Known from "Ware" and "USM". A collaboration between the eastern German "art music area" Chemnitz and the Asian "think tank" Tapei, this is a well done attainment between abstractism and installed sound worlds based upon sheer house.

 

Spex (DE)
After the Raster-Noton oriented albums by Byetone and Tol as well as the unfocussed electronic explorations by Fold and Eonta, Essen based label BineMusic makes a swing with his fifth release. Benjamin Brunn already impressed on other minimal house labels like usm or out to lunch, so on his debut album you find this on-the-edge-of-house drafts that know of its structures, yet neglect its direct body appeal. Listing-house (if this word would not sound that dull) that can usually be found on normoton or Out To Lunch, completed with jazzyness for which Move D and his adepts did a lot of pioneer work. A smooth hull.

 

Chemnitzer Stadtmagazin "371" (DE)
A really transparent album. Small glassy sound layers are edged by snare lines of which silent dust hiss trickles off. Its dim shining reminding of the not binding melancholy of a sun beam does not come unexpected, although "König und Drache" does not give away from where. Benjamin Brunn's debut album sounds sensible, introverted and fine. House bass lines are triggered only slightly, sounds travel through the room and arrangements get built up with lots of caution and quietude. Resulting in a complete sound works that is nothing but poignantly beautiful.

 

Lecker Elektro (DE)
Maybe you thought that Benjamin Brunn would play a tribute to his former releases on Ware and Mole - which were more targeted towards the "shaking" side of dancing - on his debut album. Instead his first longplayer arrives really chilled and full of rich sounds that aim for the wing chair. Nevertheless his house relations can be felt all over the place, even if it's the more relaxed and minimal kind. Nice one!

 

Frequenzen - A. Wendt (UK)
An album that can do without, ... Without skipping, without altering the volume, without interfering at all. Benjamin Brunn's 'König und Drache' organically flows, swells, fades, it rises and disappears. It embraces a variety of electronic music composition styles and evolves constantly fresh patterns, structures. For long time i have not received promo material that could do without.

 

Smallfish (UK)
Fifth release on this Raster-Noton related imprint sees Benjamin Brunn (of united states of mars fame) delivering nine tracks of tidy, crisply produced electronic sounds. Taking a dubby, 4/4 angle at times and building the percussion up slowly from obsucre beginnings into semi-grooving tracks you get a subtle selection that'll satisfy the thirst of even the most avid glitch / click fan. Brilliant, in my opinion.

 

Beam Me Up (DE)
Hectic, stress, crisis, noise, chaos: the daily terror is all around us, and between all this Benjamin Brunn produces music that turns all this in a opp field ("other people's problem", as from the hitchhiker's guide to the galaxy). While listening to "König und Drache" i imagine a helicopter flight through the urban canyons of asian cities (Brunn lived and worked in Taipei for several months) during which the noise is faded out, only leaving this beautiful music. Everything becomes peaceful, fades into a self concient slow motion flow. Still Brunn does not produced pure ambient works, but his tracks groove and pend between layers and minimal beats. Music to breathe, relax - and then getting back into the mayhem at volume level 11.

 


 


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